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Victoria is facing a public-safety crisis

daftandbarmy

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Or setting them.

tfd106 GIF by Tacoma FD
 

AmmoTech90

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They called you at home? They never called, or paged us at home.

We worked 40-hours a week at the station. Like any other job.

After that, your time was your own.
Oooh, I can contribute to an ambulance thread! First time given I don't know much about them. My wife's best friend lives just outside a small town in (very) rural Saskatchewan. Day to day as a beef farmer. Qualified as an EMR, and her and a friend are the local ambulance service. Get a call, go get the ambulance and do their thing.
 

brihard

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We called it Standby. It was not a normal requirement of the job. It was voluntary. I never did it. I'm not sure if anyone did.

But, it was in the collective agreement. So, I guess they could have forced the issue, if they had wanted - by reverse seniority.

Standby paid a minimum of three (3) hours at regular straight time.
If ordered in while on Standby, all hours were paid at time a half. Four hours minimum.

I did, occasionally, accept voluntary Overtime, when offered. If it was a day shift. 0700 - 1900.
OT paid a guaranteed 12 hours - at time and a half. That made it worth while.
And, you had plenty of notice.

If you did not want to be offered OT, they would put you on a Do Not Disturb list.



Reading that, I've got to say, when we were off duty - they left you alone.
It’s voluntary, but basically everyone in those detachments accepts it. It’s the only way to have coverage. The on call is paid at either one hour for every four or one hour for every eight depending on how quickly available you are. A callback to duty is a minimum three hour callout if you have to physically go, or minimum one hour if it can be handled ‘work from home’ via a phone call.

In some places they barely get called out, in others it’s constant, to the point of being potentially unsafe.
 

lenaitch

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It’s voluntary, but basically everyone in those detachments accepts it. It’s the only way to have coverage. The on call is paid at either one hour for every four or one hour for every eight depending on how quickly available you are. A callback to duty is a minimum three hour callout if you have to physically go, or minimum one hour if it can be handled ‘work from home’ via a phone call.

In some places they barely get called out, in others it’s constant, to the point of being potentially unsafe.
Back in my Field days at non-24 hour detachments it was completely informal. Off-going shift would take turns until about 0400 then day shift would be called. No stand-by pay. If you changed your mind and decided to have a few beer when you got home and couldn't take a call, no harm no foul (don't make a habit of it, though) - they'd call somebody else. Just part of life in a small office. Callback was 4 hours (I think it might be six now). Now, it seems, many of the current generation want no part of it. I have heard some bright-bulb commanders started adding callout assignments on the duty roster but still feeling it is voluntary. Hmmm.
 

Scott

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Oh man…. I don’t know how you guys managed to avoid some major mess-ups when waking up, gearing up, and driving within 60 seconds.

Did you guys ever have a “Wait, where’s Bob?” moment? (Be honest… 😉)

I know a Bob story and the dude's name is Bob.

The boys had a long day out of a larger downtown fire station. A call came in about midnight and things went as per until the driver asked where the Captain was. Senior guy went back to Bob's office to semi gently wake him and off they went.
 

CBH99

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One week course. Airway management, O2 therapy. SFA+O2+HCP CPR+ some other stuff
Wow! Is it still only a week long, or has that changed within the last year or two?

There used to be a 2 week condensed course offered here in Alberta for EMR. I finished the course, took the provincial licensing exam (only costs around $700-ish) - then went on and got qualified as an EMT.

When I recently looked into getting qualified as an EMR again (I’m woefully out of practice…I did the course in 2005…) I was surprised at how much longer it is now! (Here in AB anyway.)

Most were several months long, but I also couldn’t find one that wasn’t only 3 days a week or so.
 

mariomike

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More like "arson", and while the wanting to appear a hero may get some of them going, it's not a catch all.

It is not like firefighters drive around, looking for fires…

Or setting them.

Well, we did have one guy in the volunteer department at one of my postings . . .

For reference to the discussion, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Special Report: "Firefighter Arson".
 

Scott

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Thanks for proving the point that I made.

The hero syndrome you mentioned is just one of the subsets of firefighter arsonists.
 

mariomike

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Scott

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And a half gallon of gas is still cheaper than a movie ticket.

I am sure there's a boredom motivated arsonist working in my area. I think it could be a firefighter, but that's based solely on how I feel having had conversations with other FFs about it.
 

mariomike

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A callback to duty is a minimum three hour callout if you have to physically go, or minimum one hour if it can be handled ‘work from home’ via a phone call.
They used to call us at home with questions from the police, hospital or coroner. Or, the Dept., if there was a serious complaint or concern.

But, they tried to hold on to their questions until you returned to duty.

Because even a phone call to your house to ask a question(s) cost the taxpayers four (4) hours pay at regular over time rate. ie: six regular hours.

I knew a guy assigned to a 9-5 office job at HQ. He did liason work. Paid Duty etc. The customers were paging him at home at all hours, and he billed them mercilessly. Just for returning phone calls.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Thanks for proving the point that I made.

The hero syndrome you mentioned is just one of the subsets of firefighter arsonists.
or better yet , your mother wants you to be a hero and sets fires for you to put out.....

Fire fighting used to be one of primary employment of remote First Nations, quite a few suspicious fires during slow seasons. I have not heard of it being as much of an issue as other resource jobs opened up.
 

mariomike

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Fire fighting used to be one of primary employment of remote First Nations, quite a few suspicious fires during slow seasons. I have not heard of it being as much of an issue as other resource jobs opened up.

The USDHS seems to confirm that,
There are some motives that are particular to firefighters. For example, the primary motives for firefighter arson seem to be the need to be seen as a hero, to practice extinguishing fires, or to earn extra money.

As Scott pointed out,

The hero syndrome you mentioned is just one of the subsets of firefighter arsonists.
 
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