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The CC-130-J Hercules Merged Thread

CBH99

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At some point, someone told me that a coalition context, there are tons of shooters. There are never enough spotters (ISR platforms), transports, and tankers.
I can’t remember where I heard that, but I remember someone explained that to me also.

Fighter jets are actually one of the cheapest ways to contribute to a coalition operation. They are also fairly safe in terms of risk, so countries can be seen to be active participants without having to accept higher risk

- The pilots, aircrew, and ground crew/technicians are all getting paid whether they are deployed or not. If deployed, they are paid more - but the salaries get paid regardless.

- The jets use fuel all the same, whether they are flying in the air above Iraq, Cold Lake, Alaska, Europe, etc.

- Unused munitions that are going to expire either need to be expended, or retired/disassembled. So whether it is a training target on a range, or a real target in an AO - preference is to use the ordinance.


Having fighter jets taxiing around with missiles and bombs visible, and some good camera work of them taking off to “go do some good thing somewhere” looks awesome, always. Government looks good, military looks good, helps with recruiting, national image, etc.

Heavy movers & strategic airlift, along with dedicated ISR and EW assets, are usually in short supply.

Not many countries bother to invest in a proper EW aircraft, or a dedicated C2 platform - so the ones that are participating in a coalition are usually a decent chunk of what’s available in total.

Lose an F-16 due to aircraft failure or enemy fire? Probably fairly easy to send in a replacement in short order. Lose a C-17, or refuelled that isn’t USAF? Not so much.


(Can’t remember where someone was explaining this to us. But it was while we were down in the US, and the person explaining it was involved in coordinating hanger space for repairs/maintenance for coalition aircraft operations. Made sense when he explained it.)
 

suffolkowner

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and 15 new SAR aircraft which didn’t make much sense in any way other than lowest bidder… 😕😔
I don't believe Airbus was the lowest bidder, one of the controversies with the procurement and 16 aircraft plus one maintanence demonstrator
 

kev994

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I don't believe Airbus was the lowest bidder, one of the controversies with the procurement and 16 aircraft plus one maintanence demonstrator
Sorta. There was some confusion/controversy because the optional maintenance extension, if exercised, put the airbus bid over budget. Skies article
 

daftandbarmy

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Get your fishing rods....

View attachment 66515

We did some TEWTs in Norway, centred on the battles along the coast during the German invasion of 1940, and it was interesting to see how the Germans successfully deployed seaplane based troops to continually 'outflank' the allied road block positions.

They're pretty weather dependent though, moreso than other aircraft I would assume.
 

Blackadder1916

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We did some TEWTs in Norway, centred on the battles along the coast during the German invasion of 1940, and it was interesting to see how the Germans successfully deployed seaplane based troops to continually 'outflank' the allied road block positions.

They're pretty weather dependent though, moreso than other aircraft I would assume.

 

daftandbarmy

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Harbour Air is Canada's secret strategic air reserve.

As long as the Turbo Otter can match the performance of the Do-26 :)


German 2nd Mountain Division at Narvik Part II​


Nord-Norge hoisted the German flag as it came within sight of Hemnesberg, where it docked at 1900 hours on May 10. However, the German attack had started shortly before then when two Do-26 seaplanes landed a small group of men from Co 7 of the 138th Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant Rudlof, at Sund, a short distance east of Hemnesberg. Another five seaplanes bringing in additional troops from Co 7, about 70 in all, followed shortly. The seven seaplanes made multiple trips to Hemnesøy, bringing in equipment and supplies.

There was a Norwegian squad-size security force in the Hemnesberg harbor area along with approximately 30-35 British troops from the 1st Independent Co. These forces opened fire on the Germans before the ship reached the pier. The mountain troops stormed ashore, covered by fire from the machineguns on the steamer, and they launched a full-scale attack on the small British/Norwegian force when German aircraft appeared overhead and dropped bombs. The fighting was sharp and at close quarters but the British and Norwegians were eventually driven out of the village, leaving most of their heavier equipment behind. Five Germans and eight British soldiers were killed and a larger number were wounded.

 
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