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National Truck Driver Shortage

kev994

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I've had DND move me for thousands of dollars. I've moved myself when I hired Two Men and a Truck to move me. I've had Two Men Without a Truck (or a few buddies) load me at one end and unload me at the other while I drove the Penske truck myself (rented it in the US - much cheaper than U-Haul)

Doing it myself was less stressful then wondering where the semi with six loads on it is on any given day and sure costs a lot less. It might be easier to simply give our folks a few extra days to move and just give them a lump sum payment based on distance and size of family and let them do whatever they want and just pocket the excess. Amazing how smoothly things work for a young pup when he can make a small profit from it.

🍻
The Americans have something like this; you get 3 options: 1. Full move- just like us 2. “Full Diddy” (I don’t think this is the real name but that’s what they call it)- They give you cash, you move yourself. 3. Partial Diddy- you rent (not own) a trailer, weigh it empty, put some of your stuff in it and weigh it again, they pay by weight and the movers take the rest. It’s also really common for them to take cash in lieu of HHT and the days they would have taken for HHT become part of their TNL or unpack or whatever they want to do with those days, most families use it to explore America on their way.
 

kev994

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Moving Scams on the Rise
I’ll bet someone gets caught up in this and the CAF’s response will be something to the effect of ‘we can’t help you, this is your contract, but we can put you in line to get some mental health services in 4-6 weeks.’
 

hattrick72

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The Americans have something like this; you get 3 options: 1. Full move- just like us 2. “Full Diddy” (I don’t think this is the real name but that’s what they call it)- They give you cash, you move yourself. 3. Partial Diddy- you rent (not own) a trailer, weigh it empty, put some of your stuff in it and weigh it again, they pay by weight and the movers take the rest. It’s also really common for them to take cash in lieu of HHT and the days they would have taken for HHT become part of their TNL or unpack or whatever they want to do with those days, most families use it to explore America on their way.
I was going to say exactly this.
 

MJP

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The Americans have something like this; you get 3 options: 1. Full move- just like us 2. “Full Diddy” (I don’t think this is the real name but that’s what they call it)- They give you cash, you move yourself. 3. Partial Diddy- you rent (not own) a trailer, weigh it empty, put some of your stuff in it and weigh it again, they pay by weight and the movers take the rest. It’s also really common for them to take cash in lieu of HHT and the days they would have taken for HHT become part of their TNL or unpack or whatever they want to do with those days, most families use it to explore America on their way.
I am dubious any approach other than full meal deal would work given the amount of hand holding our members need. I love my own options but I can also adult for myself
 

kratz

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But a system wherein a BOR clerk has to simply enter in some basic move data into a program which will automatically spit out a number based off of cost estimates pre-calculated and regularly updated by DCBA or whomever, and then approve the transfer of funds of that magic number into the member's bank account shouldn't be too taxing. The rest would be on the member, basically what FJAG alluded to.

If such a centralised computer system is so simple, why not add it to an end-user system like Claims-X and just have members input their info from the posting message and new location. No need for clerks at all.
 

Ostrozac

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I am dubious any approach other than full meal deal would work given the amount of hand holding our members need. I love my own options but I can also adult for myself
Well, it might beat the current model, where the department subcontracts out a move to companies that are seemingly incapable of actually moving furniture, and pays dearly for the privilege. There’s an average cost to the department of something like $30k a move, and the status quo doesn’t seem to be working. I submit that if we gave members a duffel bag of $30k in cash each, a posting message and a report date, and told them to figure it out, they would.
 

daftandbarmy

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The whole NA supply chain is under stress, and has been for years, with demand continually outstripping supply:


The longer-term trend for truck driving labor in Canada has some parallels to the United States. According to Trucking HR Canada, by 2023, Canada is expected to be short 25,000 drivers. This vacancy rate is 25% higher than historical benchmarks. Like the United States, Canada faces an aging trucking workforce, low percentages of women and younger truck drivers compared to other industries, as well as a very high driver turnover rate.

 

Infanteer

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To be honest, I'm not concerned about that. I believe that within the next generation (so, say 15-20 years) long-haul trucking will be automated.
 

mariomike

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I believe that within the next generation (so, say 15-20 years) long-haul trucking will be automated.
With automatic transmissions in the newer trucks, no more double-clutching or splitting gears.

Might make it easier to train new drivers, while waiting for the next generation of trucks.
 

Quirky

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I submit that if we gave members a duffel bag of $30k in cash each, a posting message and a report date, and told them to figure it out, they would.

That would mean they would actually have to read the relocation directive and understand what it means. Moves for the majority of CF members are relatively simple if you know your entitlements and what you can claim. When the truck doesn't show up on load day that's when someone else needs to step in and solve the issue.

If I was a qualified truck driver a moving company would be my last option for employment. Who wants the extra physical stress from moving heavy boxes before needing to drive across the country. My first stop would be a shipping courier that just runs your cheap chinese crap from Amazon on dedicated routes and schedules.
 

SupersonicMax

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No real need to read it. Just give the members the money for how much their move would cost and let them move as they wish. Don’t want to conduct an HHT? You still get the money and you still have to find accommodation. Want to sell all your furniture? You still get the money for moving your H&E, but you’ll have to buy stuff at destination. Basically, you put the onus on the member to get themselves from A to B.
 

dapaterson

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Holds up until the first time a PO1 in Halifax complains to the media that the military has abandoned him.

That he took his duffel bag with 30k next door to the dockyard and bet it all on red won't be part of the story he tells.


More seriously, the biggest single cost in most moves is real estate fees; even negotiated down to 4%, that's $20k on a $500k house.
 

SupersonicMax

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Holds up until the first time a PO1 in Halifax complains to the media that the military has abandoned him.

That he took his duffel bag with 30k next door to the dockyard and bet it all on red won't be part of the story he tells.


More seriously, the biggest single cost in most moves is real estate fees; even negotiated down to 4%, that's $20k on a $500k house.
The US Military seems to be able to deal with it without much issues. Not sure why there is a perception that our members are a bunch of dumb folks that need hand holding. Plus, there is always the option to get a full move.
 

mariomike

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If I was a qualified truck driver a moving company would be my last option for employment. Who wants the extra physical stress from moving heavy boxes before needing to drive across the country. My first stop would be a shipping courier that just runs your cheap chinese crap from Amazon on dedicated routes and schedules.
Hand-bombing in and out of people's homes? No thanks! Rather stick to bumping docks.
 

dapaterson

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Maintaining the full system while permitting opt out from the same system and requiring people to go through a subset in order to opt out would cause confusion at best.

And the additional tax challenges members would face from a fully taxable payment that they would offset through claiming moving expenses... I am not sanguine it would be a smooth roll out.
 
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SupersonicMax

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The US has a hybrid system with 3 options. Are we somehow less capable than the US military in moving around the country?
 

Blackadder1916

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The US Military seems to be able to deal with it without much issues. Not sure why there is a perception that our members are a bunch of dumb folks that need hand holding. Plus, there is always the option to get a full move.

There is however some significant reimbursement (and taxation) differences between the Canadian and American military. As has been mentioned, one of the biggest costs in a move claim is real estate fees. The US military don't have that problem; they don't (or didn't 30 years ago when I was down there) reimburse real estate fees or other closing costs for most military PCS moves (though they do for civilian employees of the DOD). It had to do with the fact that military members receive a non-taxable allowance for housing. Also, the IRS treats such fees differently than the CRA for moving expenses - tied in with tax deductibility of mortgage interest, property taxes, etc and capital gains exemptions for primary residences.

As for the limited availability of drivers and movers noted in Canada, there is a similar challenge in the USA.
A message to DOD Personnel and their Families:

Like many sectors, labor challenges in the moving and storage industry are driving tighter-than-normal capacity in the Defense Personal Property Program. These challenges are compounded by competition with non-DOD clients (like corporate and residential customers) vying for the same services. In many locations, DOD personnel must wait upwards of four to six weeks for available moving crews. Demand is similarly high for rental trucks and storage containers used by customers interested in a Personally Procured Move. Senior leaders across the DOD’s Personnel and Logistics communities are aware of the issues and are exploring options to solve relocation-related problems for military families.
 

lenaitch

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A civilian tale so I don't know how much it relates to the military world, but on my first transfer from a tiny southern Ontario town to N/W Ont., I was single and didn't own a lot. I had a hard time getting even one moving company to give an estimate (we needed 3) for such a small job. I proposed that I rent a U-Haul trailer, move myself and they pay the rental costs (they would be paying mileage, accom. etc. for me anyway). I was turned down on the basis that, since it was duty-related, they would be liable if I injured myself in the loading, etc. In hindsight, I should have just had a yard sale and started over.
 

daftandbarmy

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To be honest, I'm not concerned about that. I believe that within the next generation (so, say 15-20 years) long-haul trucking will be automated.
Or the railways will own everything ground delivered and we‘ll all be screwed :)
 

kev994

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There is however some significant reimbursement (and taxation) differences between the Canadian and American military. As has been mentioned, one of the biggest costs in a move claim is real estate fees. The US military don't have that problem; they don't (or didn't 30 years ago when I was down there) reimburse real estate fees or other closing costs for most military PCS moves (though they do for civilian employees of the DOD). It had to do with the fact that military members receive a non-taxable allowance for housing. Also, the IRS treats such fees differently than the CRA for moving expenses - tied in with tax deductibility of mortgage interest, property taxes, etc and capital gains exemptions for primary residences.

As for the limited availability of drivers and movers noted in Canada, there is a similar challenge in the USA.
DoD still doesn’t reimburse real estate fees as of 2018, their system is set up for everyone to rent. A lot of people who do buy just keep the house and rent it out when they PCS.
 
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