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C3 Howitzer Replacement

FJAG

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As a planning basis how about recruiting a battery of volunteers to be able to generate a troop for the field?
I've kind of hinted at this but what I would really like to see is Reg F regiments doing all their leave and APs stuff in say June and July and for two weeks in August hold a regimental exercise which includes the full regiment and the P Res batteries.

We used to hold 2 week Milcons in Pet where the Ontario Militia fielded two full eight-gun batteries and 2 RCHA supplied the regimental command post, a core signals and logistics function and directing staff for every gun, command post and forward observer. We got to know each other pretty well.

2 RCHA has recently had exercises during their normal training year where the reserves provided detachments but those are exceptions. If what I'm hearing about Force 2025 then combined summer exercises should become a regular event.

🍻
 

Dale Denton

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Could we not do this at least?

Estonian army should receive six M270A1 MLRS by 2024​

POSTED ON THURSDAY, 16 DECEMBER 2021 15:53
Source
According to ERR, the M270 (or M270A1) multiple launch rocket systems (MLRS) mentioned in the 2031 national defense development plan should be at the disposal of the Estonian Defense Forces (EDF) by 2024, with the procurement hopefully declared in 2022, EDF commander Lt. Gen. Martin Herem told Vikerraadio on December 15.

As a hint, Poland is planning to procure 12 M270 MLRS systems from the U.S. at an item price of €20 million.
 

dapaterson

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Andrew Leslie when commander of the Army was still (or maybe again) promising MLRS in the next few years.
 

FJAG

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In 1989 the D Arty Briefing had MRLS Batteries for the RCHA Reg'ts given that 30 years has passed and none have been acquired - I tend to doubt that.
RCHA is a name with multiple meanings. In the 1980s MLRS was to be part of div arty and not the brigade close support regiments. Whether MLRS would have been given an RCHA designation is questionable. These days they would probably come under 4 RCA(GS)

Andrew Leslie when commander of the Army was still (or maybe again) promising MLRS in the next few years.
Yes he did and to my understanding its never really been off the list, just very far down the priorities as AD died and STA, MRR, STACC, ASCC and a multitude of other things were borne. The problem is that most things have been PY neutral and there just aren't the folks to man new stuff (unless glory be, someone finally gives real gear to the reserves) and the higher ups in the Army keep forgetting that someday they may need massed fires again. Maybe the folks who grew up with weapons that only fired out to 300 metres and who thought that a C6 is heavy fire support will finally begin to understand what deep strike really fits in - even for a pokey brigade.

Force 2025 has been hinting at "future capabilities" which seem to show shadow images of HIMARS but I'll wait to see what shakes out once the PYs for GBAD are actually at their consoles and turning dials and throwing switches.

:cautious:
 

Kirkhill

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24 US Army programs for 2023


1. PrSM: Precision Strike Missile

2. ERCA: Extended Range Cannon Artillery

3. LRHW: Long Range Hypersonic Weapon

4. MRC: Mid-Range Capability

The first item on the list, the Precision Strike Missile, rocketed past a milestone earlier this year when it flew beyond 499km, that much closer to full production.

HIMARS/ M270 MLRS

Guided MLRS Unitary: The combat-proven Guided MLRS Unitary round integrates a 200-pound unitary warhead, providing precision strike for point targets. The Unitary variant has a range exceeding 70 kilometers.

Guided MLRS Alternative Warhead (AW): The Guided MLRS AW round was the first munition developed to service area targets without the effects of unexploded ordnance, complying with the U.S. Department of Defense cluster munitions policy and international policies. The AW variant has a range exceeding 70 kilometers and delivers a 200-pound class fragmenting warhead.

Extended-Range (ER) Guided MLRS: A new developmental variation of the Guided MLRS family, ER GMLRS offers an extended range out to 150 kilometers in all weather conditions. ER GMLRS shares significant commonality with legacy Guided MLRS, and is deployable by HIMARS and the MLRS M270 family of launchers. The rounds incorporate a larger motor and have enhanced maneuverability due to tail-driven control.

Lockheed Martin PrSM Specifics:
  • Two PrSM rounds per launch pod
  • Ranges from 60 to 499 kilometers
  • Based upon Lockheed Martin’s decades of unparalleled experience in Precision Fires rockets and missiles
  • Open systems architecture
  • Modular and easily expandable
  • IM energetic payload
  • Compatible with both MLRS M270 and HIMARS family of launchers

Wainwright, Shilo and even Suffield are starting to look like pretty tight training areas. Launch from Suffield impact in Cold Lake Air Weapons Range?
 

Weinie

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24 US Army programs for 2023






HIMARS/ M270 MLRS





Wainwright, Shilo and even Suffield are starting to look like pretty tight training areas. Launch from Suffield impact in Cold Lake Air Weapons Range?
24 US Army programs for 2023






HIMARS/ M270 MLRS





Wainwright, Shilo and even Suffield are starting to look like pretty tight training areas. Launch from Suffield impact in Cold Lake Air Weapons Range?
Not a chance in hell. That would take them over populated areas. Locals would go nuts.
 

Kirkhill

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Silly Bugger Excursion Time.

Consider an army fielding 24x M777s. Consider also each M777s requiring a crew of 10 gun numbers.

24x 10 equals 240 gun numbers.

Now consider replacing the M777s with modern SPHs like the Archer.

240 gun numbers will crew 80 SPHs - Not 24 but 80.

Or, you could crew 24 SPHs AND
24 HIMARS (or MLRS) AND
still have 96 gun numbers left over to man 3 MR AD Batteries each with 32 gun numbers.

24 SPHs = 6 Tps of 4 Tubes
24 HIMARS = 6 Tps of 4 Launchers

32 AD gunners = 3x This

1641364546786.png

Or some unknown, but greater, number of This

1641364635176.png
 

KevinB

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I think the CAF has 37 M777 -- plus how many C3 and LG1?
I think there are a lot more Arty PY available.
Retain the 777's for the Res and Light Bde - and use the other Reg't for Archer etc.
 

FJAG

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I think the CAF has 37 M777 -- plus how many C3 and LG1?
I think there are a lot more Arty PY available.
Retain the 777's for the Res and Light Bde - and use the other Reg't for Archer etc.
Just under a hundred and around 28 - can't speak for how many are serviceable any given day.

the three Reg F CS regts are established at around 550 each; 4 RCA (GS) at around 450; and the RCSA at around 250 for a total of 2,350 all ranks. The Reg F PYs for artillery are at around 550 0fficers and just under 2,000 NCMs which leaves only around 150 to staff the numerous staff jobs throughout the army from RSS to Army HQ and all the other slots here and there. That's fairly tight.

In most of the recent transformations the game has been net zero. When the arty formed STA batteries it gave up gun batteries. When it formed 10 man dets for the M777 it gave up guns. The OP parties were mostly a reshuffle but the did add some extra positions. 4 GS basically came out of the large cutback of 4 AD. The new GBAD program does have new PYs as part of it but it's not very many.

The only significant way to stretch existing PYs is to give a portion of gun dets and certain other positions (ammo dets, some STA etc) to Res F pers. While there are some savings on automated systems which can get away with 3 man dets v 10 man dets, one mustn't forget that these automated systems have a whole different system of maintenance and ammo reload/resupply which in and of itself can be very manpower intensive.

I'm certainly on board for relegating M777s to one full three-battery "light" CS regiment and two "spare batteries" (which is what 37 guns could give you - leaving seven guns for the RCAS and maint system and none as "operational stock".) With that probably two batteries should be Reg F for RFL 1 with the "light regiment" while the other three of those batteries could be Res F. You could probably achieve that within current PY limits.

🍻
 

dapaterson

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The 2350 all ranks in the schools and units are not all gunners, there are about 400 personnel with other occupations in that tally (cooks, clerks, maintainers, signallers...)
 

Kirkhill

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HIMARS is intended to engage and defeat artillery, air defence concentrations, trucks, and light armour and personnel carriers, as well as support troop and supply concentrations. The system launches its weapons and moves away from the area at high speed before enemy forces locate the launch site.

- Sounds like just the thing to support an array of light armoured vehicles and widely distributed light infantry companies on a dispersed battle field

HIMARS retains the same self-loading and autonomous features installed on the MLRS.

- It doesn't sound (or look) as if it needs much ammunition support as it can reload itself from a ground cache.



The high-mobility artillery rocket system is operated by a crew of three: the driver, gunner and section chief. However, the computer-based fire control system enables a crew of two or a single soldier to load and unload the system. The fire control system includes video, keyboard control, a gigabyte of programme storage and global positioning system (GPS). The fire control computer allows firing missions to be carried out in automatic or manual mode.

In a typical mission, a command and control post would transmit the selected target data via a secure data link to the HIMARS on-board launch computer. The computer then aims the launcher and provides prompt signals to the crew to arm and fire a pre-selected number of rounds. The launcher can aim at a target in just 16 seconds. It is possible for the crew to select pre-programmed multiple mission sequences, which have been stored in the computer.



The high-mobility artillery rocket system carries a single six-pack of rockets on the army’s family of medium tactical vehicles (FMTV) 6×6 all-wheel drive 5t truck supplied by Armor Holdings Tactical Vehicle Systems Division (now BAE Systems Mobility & Protection Systems) in Texas.

The vehicle weighs approximately 24,000lb (10,886kg) compared to more than 44,000lb (19,958kg) for the MLRS M270 launcher.
HIMARS is transportable on the C-130 aircraft,



MARINE CORPS: High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) Operator​

As a member of a HIMARS Battery, Operators prepare the HIMARS for movement, combat, and firing. They inspect and prepare the launcher system for employment to include movement to and from concealment positions and firing positions, operate the fire control systems, and handle multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) family of munitions (MFOM). HIMARS Operators perform preventative maintenance and clean system components. They make routine tests and authorized repairs to HIMARS. They provide security, camouflage positions, and protect HIMARS from chemical warfare agents. This MOS will be assigned by the CMC (MM).





I would be surprised if the job requirements of Archer gunners and AD missileers were much different (not including the radar and command elements).

In the case of the Archer ammo handling appears to consist of a truck with a seacan and a couple of conveyors with a couple of ammo numbers in the seacan and a couple of gun numbers on the gun truck.


If anything I would expect the missile systems to be less problematic for the operators, fewer moving parts.




















HIMARS – High-Mobility Artillery Rocket System​

HIMARS (high-mobility artillery rocket system) is the newest member of the multiple-launch rocket system (MLRS) family.

Crew​

Three crew: driver, gunner, section chief

Manufacturer​

HIMARS: Lockheed Martin; HIMARS vehicle: BAE Systems

Length​

7m

Width​

2.4m
Expand
HIMARS-133ATD-2-Crane.jpg
Lockheed Martin has delivered approximately 500 HIMARS launchers to the US Army and its international customers as of October 2018.
800px-HIMARS_-_missile_launched.jpg
The high mobility artillery rocket system fires the US Army's new guided Multiple Launch Rocket System during testing at White Sands Missile Range. Credit: US Army.
2l-image-DeepStrike-Missile.jpg
The M142 HIMARS can fire two DeepStriker missiles from a single weapons pod.
HIMARS-133ATD-2-Crane.jpg
Lockheed Martin has delivered approximately 500 HIMARS launchers to the US Army and its international customers as of October 2018.
800px-HIMARS_-_missile_launched.jpg
The high mobility artillery rocket system fires the US Army's new guided Multiple Launch Rocket System during testing at White Sands Missile Range. Credit: US Army.


HIMARS (high-mobility artillery rocket system) is the newest member of the multiple-launch rocket system (MLRS) family.
HIMARS is a highly mobile artillery rocket system offering the firepower of MLRS on a wheeled chassis.
It was developed in 1996 by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control under an advanced concept technology demonstration (ACTD) programme.

HIMARS is intended to engage and defeat artillery, air defence concentrations, trucks, and light armour and personnel carriers, as well as support troop and supply concentrations. The system launches its weapons and moves away from the area at high speed before enemy forces locate the launch site.

HIMARS rocket fire control system​

HIMARS retains the same self-loading and autonomous features installed on the MLRS.
The improved launcher mechanical system (ILMS) upgrade and electronics of the improved fire control system (IFCS), which upgraded MLRS M270 launchers, are also fitted to HIMARS vehicles.
Lockheed Martin’s universal fire control system (UFCS), a further evolutionary upgrade of the fire control system, has completed development and qualification. From mid-2008, it is being fitted to full-rate production HIMARS. Successful HIMARS test firings of the ATACMS missile (in March 2008) and GMLRS rockets (in May 2008) took place using the new GPS-guided UFCS.
The high-mobility artillery rocket system is operated by a crew of three: the driver, gunner and section chief. However, the computer-based fire control system enables a crew of two or a single soldier to load and unload the system. The fire control system includes video, keyboard control, a gigabyte of programme storage and global positioning system (GPS). The fire control computer allows firing missions to be carried out in automatic or manual mode.

In a typical mission, a command and control post would transmit the selected target data via a secure data link to the HIMARS on-board launch computer. The computer then aims the launcher and provides prompt signals to the crew to arm and fire a pre-selected number of rounds. The launcher can aim at a target in just 16 seconds. It is possible for the crew to select pre-programmed multiple mission sequences, which have been stored in the computer.

High mobility artillery rocket system munitions​

In addition to the standard MLRS round, HIMARS is capable of launching the entire MLRS family of munitions, including the extended-range rocket, the reduced-range practice rocket and all future variants. The high-mobility artillery rocket system carries a single six-pack of MLRS rockets, or one army tactical missile system (ATACMS) missile.
“HIMARS is able to launch its weapons and move away at high speed.”
The extended-range MLRS rocket (ER-MLRS) improves the basic M26 range of 32km to more than 45km and the area of influence by 107%.
Extension of the HIMARS rocket motor has resulted in a reduction in the payload to 518 M85 grenades, but the dispersion of the grenades is improved for better effectiveness with fewer grenades.
In April 2004, HIMARS successfully test fired the new extended range guided rocket GMLRS, with a range of more than 70km.
The Lockheed Martin GMLRS rocket has a GPS, an inertial guidance package and small canards on the rocket nose to enhance accuracy. GMLRS completed system development and demonstration (SDD) tests in December 2002 and entered low-rate initial production in April 2003.
Initial operating capability (IOC) was achieved in 2006, but the system has been operationally deployed since September 2005 in Iraq. The GMLRS is an international programme involving the UK, Italy, France and Germany, as well as the US. The industrial team includes Diehl, MBDA and FiatAvio.
In May 2005, the first deliveries were made of a unitary variant of GMLRS, developed by General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems, with a single 81.6kg (180lb) warhead and a range of up to 70km. In October 2003, Lockheed Martin was awarded an SDD contract for 86 unitary variant rockets, which were delivered in June 2005. In June 2007, GMLRS Unitary entered low-rate initial production (LRIP).

Army tactical missile system (ATACMS)​

HIMARS is capable of firing the long-range ATACMS (army tactical missile system) guided missile. The ATACMS family includes the Block I, Block IA and Block IA Unitary missiles. The Block I missile delivers 950 anti-personnel anti-material (AP/AM) baseball-sized M74 submunitions to ranges exceeding 165km.
The Block IA missile range exceeds 300km by reducing the submunition payload to 300 bomblets and adding GPS guidance. The missile, with a single-burst warhead, was first deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in March and April of 2003.
The programme to develop the Block II missile with GPS and 13 BAT (brilliant anti-tank) submissiles and the Block IIA missile with six improved BAT submissiles was cancelled in February 2003.

HIMARS vehicle​

The high-mobility artillery rocket system carries a single six-pack of rockets on the army’s family of medium tactical vehicles (FMTV) 6×6 all-wheel drive 5t truck supplied by Armor Holdings Tactical Vehicle Systems Division (now BAE Systems Mobility & Protection Systems) in Texas.
The vehicle weighs approximately 24,000lb (10,886kg) compared to more than 44,000lb (19,958kg) for the MLRS M270 launcher.
HIMARS is transportable on the C-130 aircraft, allowing the system to be moved into areas previously inaccessible to the larger C-141 and C-5 aircraft required for the M270 launch vehicle.

HIMARS orders and deliveries​

In January 2000, Lockheed Martin was awarded an EMD (engineering and manufacturing development) contract to provide six HIMARS launchers. A further two HIMARS launchers were ordered under a two-year user evaluation programme for the US Marines Corps.
US Army and Marine Corps signed a contract in March 2003 for the low-rate initial production (LRIP) of 89 launchers for the army and four for the USMC. In January 2004, a second LRIP contract was awarded in for 25 launchers for the army and one for the USMC. A third, consisting of 37 launchers for the army and one for the USMC, was awarded in January 2005. A total procurement of 900 launchers is planned.
In November 2004, HIMARS successfully completed initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E). Three prototype HIMARS launchers were successfully used in combat during Operation Iraqi Freedom.
HIMARS entered service in June 2005 with the 27th Field Artillery, 18th Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The first full-rate production contract was awarded in December 2005.
HIMARS is also in service with 1st Battalion, 181st Field Artillery Tennessee National Guard, 158th Field Artillery Oklahoma National Guard (both since 2006) and 5th battalion, 3rd Field Artillery, Fort Lewis (since November 2007).
The first US Marine Corps battalion equipped with HIMARS, 2nd Battalion, 14th Marine Regiment, was deployed to Iraq in July 2007.
In September 2006, the United Arab Emirates requested the foreign military sale (FMS) of 20 HIMARS launchers plus munitions including 101 ATACMS block 1A, 101 ATACMS block 1A Unitary, 104 MLRS, 130 GMLRS and 130 GMLRS unitary rocket pods. The first unit was delivered in late 2009.
Lockheed Martin was awarded a further contract in January 2007 for 44 HIMARS systems for the US Army and 16 for the USMC.
The US Congress was notified of the proposed sale of 18 HIMARS launchers plus 32 Unitary GMLRS pods and 30 MLRS practice rocket pods to Singapore in September 2007. The first HIMARS launcher was delivered in July 2010. It was commissioned in the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) fleet in September 2011.
A contract for 64 launchers (57 for the US Army and seven for the USMC) was placed in January 2009.
HIMARS has been evaluated to be used as a common launch platform for GMLRS and ATACMS munitions. Two advanced medium-range air-to-air missiles (AMRAAM) were successfully fired by the HIMARS launchers in March 2009.
In November 2010, BAE Systems signed a $16.3m contract with US Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) to supply an additional 44 HIMARS vehicles. The contract is a follow-on to the June 2010 award of $24m for 63 HIMARS vehicles and appliqué kits.
The US Army placed a $139.6m contract with Lockheed Martin in January 2011 for 44 combat-proven HIMARS, bringing the total launchers to 375. The 400th HIMARS launcher was received by the US Army in September 2011.
In December 2012, the Government of Qatar requested seven M142 HIMARS launchers with the UFCS, including other weapons from the US Government. The UAE requested 12 HIMARS launchers, 100 M57 ATACMS T2K (Block IA unitary) rockets, and 65 M31A1 GMLRS unitary pods from the US in September 2014.
Lockheed Martin was awarded a $23.17m contract modification by the US Department of Defence in December 2015 for Life Cycle Launcher Support (LCLS) III on all the HIMARS FCS and launcher modules of the US Army and US Marine Corps.
In July 2017, the US Army awarded a $73.8m contract to Lockheed Martin as part of phase two of the Long Range Precision Fires (LRPF) programme, which includes technology upgrades and risk control for the development of a prototype LRPF missile system that can be launched from M142 HIMARS launchers.
Lockheed Martin delivered its first fully built chassis and launcher HIMARS in July 2017.
The Government of Romania requested 54 HIMARS launchers from the US Defence Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) in August 2017. The sale also includes 81 GMLRS M31A1, 81 GMLRS M30A1 alternative warheads, ATACMS M57 unitary, and other weapons, at an estimated cost of $1.25bn. (Edit to add - Trucks is Cheap. Missiles is not. - That equates to a low capital investment in storage and reserve with ammunition costs being downloaded to operations)
In August 2018, the US Army awarded a $218m contract to Lockheed Martin for the production of 18 HIMARS launchers and associated hardware, as the part of a FMS contract by the end of December 2020.
Lockheed Martin was also awarded a $289m contract by the US Army in September 2018 for the production of 24 M142 HIMARS launchers and associated equipment by July 2022.
Lockheed Martin has delivered approximately 500 HIMARS launchers to the US Army and its international customers as of October 2018.
Lockheed Martin received a $1.14bn FMS contract to deliver GMLRS to Poland, Bahrain and Romania, in March 2019.
In July 2019, the company was awarded a $492m contract by the US Army Contracting Command to deliver M142 HIMARS launchers and associated hardware to the US Army, US Marine Corps, Romania and Poland by 2022.
(Edit to add - another missed opportunity)
 
Last edited:

Kirkhill

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Scratch everything that follows. Kevin squared me away downthread.

Can't find the weight of a six pack of rockets but found this for the MLRS M270A1:

  • Empty weight: 45,086 pounds
  • Combat weight: 57,544 pounds
  • Maximum speed: 65 kph
  • Maximum cruising range: 640 km
  • Ordnance options: All current and future MFOM rockets and missiles
I'm going to assume the difference between the empty weight and the combat weight is the weight of two missile pods, each with 6 missiles.

57,544 - 45,086 = 12,458 lbs for two pods
= 6,229 lbs for one pod
= 2,800 kg for one pod

I reckon a CH-147 could cache 4 pods a sortie, or enough for 4 HIMARs to reload and move to an new firing point.
Scratch that, each Chinook would be more likely to lift 2 pods. Got my pounds and kilos mixed up.
 
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KevinB

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Can't find the weight of a six pack of rockets but found this for the MLRS M270A1:

  • Empty weight: 45,086 pounds
  • Combat weight: 57,544 pounds
  • Maximum speed: 65 kph
  • Maximum cruising range: 640 km
  • Ordnance options: All current and future MFOM rockets and missiles
I'm going to assume the difference between the empty weight and the combat weight is the weight of two missile pods, each with 6 missiles.

57,544 - 45,086 = 12,458 lbs for two pods
= 6,229 lbs for one pod
= 2,800 kg for one pod

I reckon a CH-147 could cache 4 pods a sortie, or enough for 4 HIMARs to reload and move to an new firing point.
Scratch that, each Chinook would be more likely to lift 2 pods. Got my pounds and kilos mixed up.
Combat weight will have troops, gear, fuel etc - not just the rocket pod weight.
M31 rockets are around 700lbs each.

Loaded Pod is 4,609lbs (or 2,095kg) each.
 

Kirkhill

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Combat weight will have troops, gear, fuel etc - not just the rocket pod weight.
M31 rockets are around 700lbs each.

Loaded Pod is 4,609lbs (or 2,095kg) each.

Thanks for that Kevin.

So the pod is just a little over the maxim cargo hook rating of the Griffon? 2041 kg if it is the same as the Bell 412 EP?

And the CH-147F could haul 4 pods?
 

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I'm certainly on board for relegating M777s to one full three-battery "light" CS regiment and two "spare batteries" (which is what 37 guns could give you - leaving seven guns for the RCAS and maint system and none as "operational stock".) With that probably two batteries should be Reg F for RFL 1 with the "light regiment" while the other three of those batteries could be Res F. You could probably achieve that within current PY limits.

🍻
Curious what niche M777s would fill in a force with SPH and a useful mix of rocket artillery, and if that niche would be ideally filled by the M777 or if there would be something (or several somethings) better on the tube artillery front for whatever roles are left once SPHs and rocket artillery are fielded.
 

Kirkhill

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Curious what niche M777s would fill in a force with SPH and a useful mix of rocket artillery, and if that niche would be ideally filled by the M777 or if there would be something (or several somethings) better on the tube artillery front for whatever roles are left once SPHs and rocket artillery are fielded.

Personally I just think the eat up manpower that could be better spent supervising optionally manned vehicles. Or using internal combustion engines instead of muscles.



Indirect fire weapon


The 81mm Mortar is an indirect fire weapon which is operated by 2 commandos and has a range of 5,650 metres. The mortar can fire a number of different types of round, including fire smoke, illuminating and high explosive rounds.

www.royalnavy.mod.uk

Support Weaponry | Royal Navy

Specialised firepower, immediately available to counter enemy vehicles, aircraft or boats. Get the full story here.
www.royalnavy.mod.uk

I had to read that twice. How do the Marines get the job done with 2 commandos? I have seen 2 on a 60mm with bipod and baseplate but never less than 3 on an 81mm and often 4.

So what is the solution?

02-45Cdo-AQ200016516.jpg




01-45Cdo-AQ200016203.jpg

03-45Cdo-AT200002233.jpg



6 Marines (Det Cmdr, Signaller, 2x Gunners, 2x Loaders)
3 BRP Canam 6x6s
2 Trailers
2x 81mm mortars with lots of bombs.

Air lift in. Fire and retire.

I wonder if the MM UGVs could be programmed to follow a soldier on an ATV?
 
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